Do's and Don'ts of Condoms - cucumber image

The Do’s and Don’ts of Condoms

Following Aspire’s awesome efforts at raising awareness around safe sex with this year’s Red Week and Red Party at The ‘Stro last week we thought it only fitting to publish this blog which gives a little more insight into what to do and what not to do when it comes to condoms! 🍆

Condoms are the only form of contraception that protects against pregnancy and STIs. But, they’re only effective if you are using them right! So here’s a little list of dos and don’ts.

TOP TIP: Advocacy & Welfare supply free condoms and lubricant, to help you practice safe sex. Head to our office and check the bowl out the front!

 

Do!

  • Do practice using and putting on condoms. If you’re new, use them when you masturbate to get the hang of it
  • Do experiment with different brands and sizes. You want to make sure you’re using condoms that fit, don’t slip off, but also are not too tight. This is so you stay protected and it feels good
  • Do use condoms during oral sex. You can still get STI’s from oral sex, so make use of all the flavoured condoms while you’re getting down to business. You can also use a condom as a dental dam!
  • Do check the expiry date. Expired condoms are going to be way less effective against STI’s and pregnancy
  • Do be prepared. Carry condoms around with you, or pack a few extra if you are meeting up with that special person
  • Do put the condom on before the action starts
  • Do use water-based or silicone-based lubricant. It not only reduces the chance of the condom breaking but can make sex feel even better for both people
  • Do use a new condom every time you switch between oral, vaginal and anal sex. It will help avoid infections, amongst other things
  • Do use condoms on sex toys. Especially if you are sharing them, or they have been used on others in the past

 

Don’t!

  • Don’t keep condoms in hot places. Your glove box and wallet are not ideal places, despite what that TV show says. Cool and dry places are much better
  • Don’t store your condom packets with sharp objects such as keys. I think we all know the risk of that one
  • Don’t use a condom more than once. If you’re planning on getting frisky a few times, or still have the occasional struggle when putting a condom on, bring a few spares
  • Don’t open the condom packet with your teeth. Again, movies like to portray it as the thing to do. Unless you like an accidentally damaged condom, just use your hands
  • Don’t flush condoms down the toilet. It’s more plastic the ocean doesn’t need, or an embarrassing plumbing phone call waiting to happen
  • Don’t use more than one condom at a time. More condoms do not mean more protection, in fact, it increases the chance of the condoms breaking.
  • Don’t use oil-based products as lube. Anything not designed specifically as lube can damage the condom and cause it to break. So avoid using things like moisturisers, baby oil, cooking oils and Vaseline.
  • Don’t use animal skin condoms as they do not protect you against STIs. If you have a latex allergy, try polyurethane condoms instead. Most brands have non-latex condoms readily available these days
  • Don’t use a condom if it looks damaged, feels sticky, is past its expiry date, or you’re just unsure about it. Throw it away and get a new one
  • Don’t unroll the condom before putting it on. It will no longer be reliable
  • Don’t forget it is your choice to wear a condom. If you want to use a condom as protection talk about it with your partner. Don’t feel pressured to take any risks you don’t want to.

    Lastly, don’t let someone use the excuse of ‘it kills the mood’ as a good reason to not use one

If you’re looking for more info there are plenty of resources around! Speak to your GP, phone the NSW Sexual Health Infolink on 1800 451 624, submit a question to a qualified sexual health nurse, or check out our online sexual health resources!


Our team at Advocacy & Welfare are here to help you when you need – if you need to talk with someone, and you’re not sure which direction to go, please reach out to our team.

You’re never alone at UNE.